Toyota Australia increasing prices 1-4% from July 1, Japan-made models

June 19, 2020

Toyota Australia will be introducing some price increases across most of its range from July 1, dealership documents have confirmed, with some models jumping by over $1000.

According to a dealer bulletin sent out this week, witnessed by PerformanceDrive, various models will receive a price hike of between 1-4 per cent (see table below). This is part of a General Price Increase, which is pretty normal, but it’s also understood to be due to recent changes in exchange rates on Japanese-made vehicles.

In the list of vehicle models impacted we notice all are produced in Japan, although, not all Japanese-made models seem to be impacted. For example, the 70 Series LandCruiser isn’t affected but the 200 Series is. The outgoing Yaris and current Prado, which are made in Japan, aren’t affected either.

The Thai-built HiLux isn’t impacted, although the brand new model unveiled a couple of weeks ago is scheduled to go on sale in Australia in August. We suspect there will be some prices changes, likely increases, for some variants.

According to the bulletin the price changes are effective from July 1. Existing orders placed before this date will be covered by price protection so long as delivery is made by October 31, unless delays are caused on Toyota Australia’s part.

The price increases apply to all grades for each model line mentioned below. Unfortunately we don’t have access to the new retail starting prices, only the price increases.

86: increase $740
Camry petrol: increase $700
Camry hybrid: increase $1200
Coaster: increase $2690
Corolla hatchback and sedan petrol: increase $560
Corolla hatchback and sedan hybrid: increase $1060
C-HR petrol and hybrid: increase $750
Granvia: increase $1100
HiAce: increase $1100
HiAce Commuter: increase $1100
LandCruiser 200 Series: increase $1170
RAV4 petrol and hybrid: increase $1300
Prius: increase $800

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.