FCAI supports NSW investment in electric vehicle infrastructure

Australia’s automotive representative body has welcomed investment news from the New South Wales government that $38 million will be invested into upgrading the state’s electric vehicle charging network.

While the $38 million investment into EV infrastructure falls far short of what experts are calling for, the recent addition to the state’s budget shows promising signs of what’s to come in the future.

The most recent announcement comes atop $149 million of funds that have been set aside to encourage the private industry to construct fast-chargers on the most popular arteries in the state, and $20 million for regional areas and tourist hotspots.

All up, the NSW government says that $633 million of investment funds have been set aside for its EV infrastructure strategy.

NSW Treasurer, Matt Keane, unveiled in the latest NSW budget for 2022-23 that both kerbside charging points and residential charging points will be a focal point of the investment funds. The Treasurer said:

“You’ll never be far from a charger on our major highways, in regional destinations, apartment buildings and on kerbsides in metropolitan areas with limited off-street parking. This funding will help communities stay connected and help holidaymakers hit the road to enjoy weekend trips as NSW motorists gear up for the next era for driving.”

Chief of the FCAI, Tony Weber, has welcomed news of the investment funds, stating that “investment in electric vehicle infrastructure is a key priority as Australia journeys towards our electric future”. Weber said:

“Building 500 kerbside charging points and equipping 125 apartment buildings to take on EV charging upgrades is going to help making owning a battery electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle more realistic for NSW motorists.”

Other incentives for Australia’s most populous state include last year’s move to waive stamp duty on electric vehicle purchases up to a threshold of $78,000, while 25,000 cash rebates were offered to buyers of EVs and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles last year.