Mazda CX-8 & Volvo XC40 score 5-star ANCAP safety rating

The new Mazda CX-8 and Volvo XC40 have been the first vehicles to be tested under ANCAP’s new, most stringent criteria yet, and they both achieved the full five-star safety rating.

ANCAP’s latest assessment program focuses on four main areas, including active and passive safety systems, as well as assessing the effectiveness of safety systems for females and children. Speaking about the new testing, ANCAP CEO James Goodwin said:

“Parents of young children will know that not all vehicles have the ability to safely fit child restraints in all seating positions. To assist, child restraint installation now forms part of each rating. We are assessing the correct installation of a range of commonly available restraints – from newborn to 10 years – in each of the rear seating positions, and 6 year and 10 year child dummies now feature in our physical crash tests.”

Despite the increase in tough criteria, the Mazda CX-8 and Volvo XC40 passed the five-star threshold. The CX-8, which has only just hit the market, scored a high 96% for adult protection, 87% for child protection, and 72% for pedestrian protection. It also received 73% for the safety assist systems.

The XC40, which joined the Aussie lineup a few months ago, scored 97% for adult protection, 84% for child occupant protection, and 71% for pedestrian protection. Assessments showed the safety systems were quite good, with a score of 78%. Speaking about the results, Goodwin said:

“Good levels of performance were achieved by the CX-8 in the area of Child Occupant Protection, with our assessment engineers praising its ability to safely accommodate child restraints in all five rear seating positions. The XC40 performed well across all areas of assessment, offering emergency lane keeping functionality and the full range of autonomous emergency braking systems.”

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.