Aston Martin Valkyrie AMR Pro lands in Geneva from outer space

The wraps are off the Aston Martin Valkyrie AMR Pro, which we first brought you sketches of in November of last year, building the regular Valkyrie and its insane performance.

The Valkyrie is one of the most exciting hypercars on the way – a collaboration between Aston Martin and Red Bull Advanced Technologies. It combines a naturally-aspirated 6.5-litre Cosworth V12, developing 843kW, with a Rimac battery system. Additionally, it also weighs only 1030kg, so it has a power-to-weight ratio of one horsepower per kilo.

Unlike the road-going version of the Valkyrie, the AMR Pro is unencumbered by the need to negotiate suburbs and registration, so it is more focused for track duties. With only 25 to be made, and all spoken for, the AMR Pro benefits from the removal of heaters, demisters, and scores a new polycarbonate windscreen and side windows, carbon-fibre wishbones for the suspension and moulded race seats. The lighter exhaust system also helps the car hit the 1000kg mark.

The powertrain is recalibrated, particularly the emission control systems and energy recovery system (ERS), meaning it is capable of hitting 362km/h and generating a staggering 3G of lateral acceleration through corners. Team principal at Aston Martin Red Bull Racing, Christian Horner, spoke of the searing yellow, extra-terrestrial racing car:

“It is hugely rewarding to see the Valkyrie AMR Pro unveiled here in Geneva, another evolutionary step in the relationship between Red Bull Racing and Aston Martin. We set out together with an ambitious and pioneering road map to create something extraordinary in partnership, and the Valkyrie AMR Pro is yet another turn of that wheel.”

What do you think of the Aston Martin Valkyrie AMR Pro? Are you as captivated by it as we are? Share your thoughts below in the comment section.

Mitchell was a contributing journalist and features writer at PerformanceDrive. He has been a passionate petrol-head from a very young age. He is excited by the future of the industry, and considers himself as a bit of a fanatic when it comes to the technical aspects of cars. He is also fascinated by new cars that are popping up in developing markets.