• www.1800accident.com.au
  • CarLoans.com.au
  • www.1800accident.com.au

Potent 2017 Audi RS 3 sedan revealed at Paris motor show

September 30, 2016

Audi’s hotly-anticipated RS 3 sedan has landed at the 2016 Paris Motor Show with a ferocious exterior to match a volcanic five-cylinder powertrain.


Previewed by the 2014 Clubsport Quattro concept, the RS 3 sedan uses a 294kW 2.5-litre turbocharged five-cylinder with 480Nm at 1700-5850rpm. This is the same engine featured in the new TT RS, and it is matched to a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox feeding force through a quattro AWD system. Power is up compared with the existing RS 3 Sportback, which generates 270kW/465Nm from the same engine.

The 0-100km/h time for this angry little beast is 4.1 seconds, before going on its way to a 280km/h autobahn-blitzing top speed. With these stats, it becomes the quickest vehicle in the small premium class, even trumping the latest 280kW Mercedes-AMG A 45 which conquers 0-100km/h in 4.2 seconds.

Keeping all that power in check are 370mm front discs clasped by eight-piston calipers, with carbon ceramic discs available too. Completing the package is an aggressive rear diffuser, pumped wheel arches, neat skirting and an aggressive front end, along with a sports-inspired interior with quilted sports bucket seats.

Many parameters are adjustable for the driver via three selectable modes; Comfort, Auto and Dynamic. These parameters include steering settings, gearbox behaviour, ECU settings, bi-modal exhaust and adjustable suspension settings.

It will be 2017 before it arrives to give the AMG A 45 a purple nurple for teutonic small car supremacy. An Australian introduction will take place about halfway through next year.

Mitchell is a contributing journalist and features writer at PerformanceDrive. He has been a passionate petrol-head from a very young age. He is excited by the future of the industry, and considers himself as a bit of a fanatic when it comes to the technical aspects of cars. He is also fascinated by new cars that are popping up in developing markets.