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Fiat 500 695 Edizione Maserati on sale in Australia from $60,000

If the Fiat 500 Abarth isn’t enough of a firecracker for you, you will be glad to hear Fiat Australia has just introduced the 695 Edizione Maserati pocket rocket to the local market.

Fiat 500 Abarth Edizione Maserati-front

Featuring a boosted version of the Abarth’s 1.4-litre turbocharged four-cylinder, the 695 produces 132kW of power and 250Nm of front-tyre-shredding torque. Times for the 0-100km/h sprint haven’t been mentioned, but considering the 118kW Abarth manages it in 6.6 seconds, you can bet it will better that.

The 695 is not all about increased engine performance though. The Edizione Maserati, as the name suggests, is inspired by the Maserati philosophy. There’s an electrically-operated manual Abarth Competizione transmission with paddle shifters, a ‘dual-mode’ exhaust system with an opening valve in the muffler, and the exhaust tips are hexagonal in traditional Maserati form.

Fiat 500 Abarth Edizione Maserati-rear

Other exterior highlights include a set of 17-inch Maserati-inspired Neptune alloy wheels, behind which is a set of Brembo brakes, and further beyond, a Koni sports suspension setup. These components provide level of sophistication and performance usually expected from Maserati.

Inside is where things jump to a completely new level for the Fiat 500. There’s a complete sand beige leather upholstery with ‘695’ embroidered seats, matt carbon trimmings, a black leather steering wheel, and a Jaeger-themed instrument panel on the dash.

To top it all off, customers also receive a Tramontano leather luggage set to accommodate your belongings during that weekend away.

Just 499 examples will be made, with just 40 landing in Australia from June. Prices start at $60,000. Full specifications and equipment included in the package is as below:

Specifications

  • 1.4-litre Turbo 16v engine – 132kW at 5500rpm and 250Nm at 3000rpm
  • Abarth Competizione gearbox (five-speed MTA) with paddle shifters
  • Maserati-inspired 17-inch Neptune alloy wheels with 205/40 R17 tyres
  • Abarth Koni shock absorbers with FSD valves (front and rear)
  • Lowered suspension geometry
  • Brembo floating, perforated and self-ventilating front disc brakes ø 305mm x 28mm
  • Brembo perforated rear disc brakes 240mm x 11mm
  • Electric power steering with Sport mode
  • Dual mode exhaust with Maserati-inspired design

Features

  • Special ‘Pontevecchio Bordeaux’ paint from Maserati
  • Xenon headlights
  • Titanium grey soft top
  • Automatic climate control
  • Sand beige leather seats from Maserati
  • JBL audio system with 9-speakers and 8-channel amplifier supplying 400W total power
  • Leather steering wheel with audio controls
  • Blue&Me TomTom navigation system
  • Dashboard fascia and gearshift trim in matte carbon
  • Door panels, console and tunnel in ‘flocked’ UV-Lux
  • Luggage set by Tramontano
  • Aluminium sports pedals
  • Aluminium sill plate with carbon fibre insert, customised with ‘Abarth 695 Edizione Maserati’ graphics

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.

  • Reggie

    “118kW Abarth manages it in 6.6 seconds”.

    Really? I have not seen one test where VBOX proper testing equipment was used where the 118kW Abarth managed anything close to getting under 7 seconds. In fact the best I’ve seen is in the low 8 second range.

    Physics will tell you 0-100k’s based on the cars power to weight, gear ratio and front wheel drive would make it impossible to achieve anywhere near 6.6 seconds. A Renault Magane RS 265 can only manage 6 flat on a good day and that car would destroy an Abarth. Are you saying the Abarth is close to the Magane in performance?

    Your website has come out with some pretty outrageous 0-100k’s times in the past (re: The Focus ST cracking 6 seconds), but this would have to take the cake.

    Where did these figures come from? I’m perplexed.

    • PerformanceDrive

      Hi Reggie,
      Thanks for your comment.

      All of our 0-100km/h videos are conducted using a combination of Racelogic g-meter and a GPS-based application. We then average the two (often multiple runs of each).

      The times should only be used as a guide. Sometimes vehicles end up quicker than manufacturer claims, while other cars end up slower.

      The main reason we time 0-100km/h is so we can all compare vehicles within our review database; all vehicles tested by us are tested in the exact same way. We then provide a video for your interpretation and/or enjoyment.

      Hope this helps.

      Cheers