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Bentley Flying Spur V8 S revealed ahead Geneva debut

February 18, 2016

Bentley’s more performance-oriented Continental Flying Spur V8 S has debuted ahead of its first public showing at the Geneva Motor Show next month.

2016 Bentley Flying Spur V8 S-front

The performance figures are impressive, too; an extra 17kW and 20Nm on the regular Flying Spur V8, for 388kW at 6000rpm and 680Nm at 1700rpm from its 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8. As a result, the 0-100km/h time drops 0.3 seconds to 4.9 seconds, while the top speed grows to 306km/h.

Even with the very respectable performance and all-wheel drive, and keeping in mind this is a massive luxury vehicle fitted with first-class-like levels of luxury, it returns 10.9L/100km in fuel consumption on the combined cycle. It also emits 254g/km of CO2.

This compares well to 377kW at 4200rpm and 1020Nm at 1750rpm from the big brother Mulsanne’s push-rod 6.75-litre twin-turbo V8. The Flying Spur’s V8 is a more compact, DOHC unit shared with Audi and potentially Lamborghini for the production Urus SUV.

However, it trails the W12 Flying Spur’s 459kW and 722Nm. This smaller-engined model is more nimble, efficient and offers better weight distribution, though. Wolfgang Dürheimer, chairman and chief executive of Bentley Motors, said:

“The Flying Spur remains unrivalled in its ability to combine class-leading comfort with remarkable dynamic ability. It’s the perfect choice for the customer who wants ultimate refinement as well as an exhilarating, spirited drive.”

2016 Bentley Flying Spur V8 S-rear

Torque is split 40-60 front:rear, with a sportier calibration for the stability control system and Continuous Damping Control (CDC) suspension. Black exterior detailing signals the faster intent of this car, with a black mesh grille and 20- or 21-inch alloy wheels.

Inside, the V8 S features a darker trim, piano black woodgrain, with options extending to semi-aniline upholstery, blacked out wing mirrors, tinted headlights and taillights, and larger rims.

Mitchell is a contributing journalist and features writer at PerformanceDrive. He has been a passionate petrol-head from a very young age. He is excited by the future of the industry, and considers himself as a bit of a fanatic when it comes to the technical aspects of cars. He is also fascinated by new cars that are popping up in developing markets.