2018 Hyundai i30 N officially revealed; all-new hot hatch (video)

After much anticipation, Hyundai has finally unveiled the all-new (well, mostly new) Hyundai i30 N hot hatch. It showcases a range of custom performance highlights and sporty design details, over and above the regular i30.

Based on the new i30, this is the first production car to be introduced by Hyundai N – the South Korean company’s new performance car division. Under the bonnet is a 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol four-cylinder engine producing 202kW (275PS) and 353Nm. This makes it the most powerful four-cylinder Hyundai ever.

There will also be a standard output version offered in some markets that develops 184kW (353Nm as well). To help get that power to the ground there’s an electronic-type limited-slip differential for the front-wheel drive system.

Out on the tarmac, acceleration from 0-100km/h is taken care of in 6.4 seconds in the standard package, or a very respectable 6.1 seconds with the higher output performance package. Both offer a top speed of 250km/h.

Drivers can choose between a plethora of driving modes, spanning from Eco, Normal, Sport, N, and N Custom. Each of these alter the powertrain in terms of throttle response, rev matching, LSD, bi-modal exhaust, and electronic sound enhancer, as well as the steering and stability control.

Visually, the i30 N looks phat. You can spot the neatly bolstered wheel arches encompassing 18-inch alloy wheels, or 19-inch items on the performance pack. There’s also a unique bodykit with front and rear spoilers, twin exhaust, and a spattering of red highlights for that racy look.

Inside is similarly decorated, with sports bucket seats, a N sports steering wheel, while the driver gets a special gear shifter and pedals. For the dash there’s a 5.0-inch LCD display or optional 8.0-inch unit, with performance data readouts including lap timer and live engine output. It also comes with full media functionality and sat-nav.

The new model will go on sale in Australia later this year, with prices and exact timing yet to be confirmed. Check out the first promo video below for more, and the full specifications table for the detailed tech and specs.

PETROL: THETA 2.0T-GDI (250PS)
TypeTHETA 2.0 T-GDI, 16-valve MLA, DOHC E-CVVT
Capacity1998 cc
Bore x stroke86.0 x 86.0 mm
Compression ratio9.5
Power250 PS (184 kW) @ 6000 rpm
Torque353 Nm @ 1450 ~ 4000 rpm
Maximum speed (km/h)250
0-100 km/h (seconds)6.4
PETROL: THETA 2.0T-GDI with Performance Package (275PS)
TypeTHETA 2.0 T-GDI, 16-valve MLA, DOHC E-CVVT
Capacity1998 cc
Bore x stroke86.0 x 86.0 mm
Compression ratio9.5
Power275 PS (202 kW) @ 6000 rpm
Torque353 Nm @ 1450 ~ 4500 rpm
Maximum speed (km/h)250
0-100 km/h (seconds)6.1

Transmissions

Gasoline engines – speeds

Engine2.0 T-GDI (250 PS)2.0T-GDI (275 PS)
Manual66

Gear ratios

THETA 2.0 T-GDI
250PS275PS
1st3.0833.083
2nd1.9311.931
3rd1.6961.696
4th1.2761.276
5th1.0271.027
6th0.8540.854
Rev.3.5883.588
Final drive4.154 (1/2/R)

3.176 (3/4/5/6)

4.333 (1/2/R)

3.250 (3/4/5/6)

Suspension

FrontMcPherson Strut
RearMulti-Link

Steering

TypeR-MDPS (RACK TYPE MOTOR DRIVEN POWER STEERING)
Steering gear ratioSTD: 12.23 (@360°), PP: 12.31 (@360°)
Turning radius5.8 metres
Steering wheel turns lock-to-lock2.14

Brakes

FrontDisc Type, 17″ : STD /18″ : OPT (PP)
RearDisc Type, 16″ : STD /17″ : OPT (HAND PARKING)
Master cylinder23.81
Booster size10″ (LHD,RHD)

Wheels and tyres

Wheel typeTyres
7.5Jx18 AL225/40R18
8.0Jx19 AL235/35R19

Dimensions (mm)

Exterior

Overall length4335
Overall width1795
Overall heightSTD: 1,451 (18” tyre) / P PKG: 1,447 (19” tyre)
Wheelbase2650
Front overhang905
Rear overhang780
Ground clearanceSTD: 136 / P PKG: 132

Interior

FrontRear
Head room994977
Leg room1,073883
Shoulder room1,4271,406

Capacities (litres)

Fuel tank50
Luggage space (without rear stiffness bar)Minimum 395
Maximum: 1.301
Luggage (with rear stiffness bar)Minimum: 381
Maximum: 1.287

Weights (kg)

THETA 2.0 T-GDI
250PS275PS
Curb weight1400 – 14801429 – 1509
Gross vehicle weight19501950

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.