2018 Holden Commodore scores 5-star ANCAP safety rating

The upcoming, all-new, German-made 2018 Holden Commodore has been awarded the full five-star ANCAP safety rating in recent tests, just weeks before its market arrival in late February.

ANCAP has assessed crash test results from Euro NCAP, and found good protection across all important areas which help result in a five-star rating for all variants, including Liftback, Sportwagon, and Tourer.

Safety assist systems scored the lowest points, with 9.4 out of 12, or 77 per cent. Speed assistance systems brought this down with a score of 1.3 out of 3. The interurban autonomous emergency braking also scored 2.2 out of 3, while other sections received 2.9 or higher out of 3.

Pedestrian protection was rated at 32.8 out of 42, or 78 per cent, while child occupant protection received 42 out of 49, or 85 per cent. Adult occupant protection received the best result, with 35.5 out of 38, or 93 per cent. ANCAP CEO James Goodwin said:

“Australian families and fleet buyers have long regarded the Commodore as a trusted local choice and the shift to overseas supply has further enhanced the model’s safety credentials. This next generation Commodore includes safety assist technologies not seen in its locally-produced predecessor, with standard-fit features such as autonomous emergency braking and active lane-keep assist.”

The new Commodore will go on sale in February, and Holden has confirmed there will be five main variant lines: LT, RS, Calais, Calais-V, RS-V, and the top VXR. These will be split up by three body styles, including Liftback sedan, Sportwagon, and the high-riding Touring.

Three engine options will be available, spanning from a 2.0-litre turbo producing 191kW/350Nm, to a 3.6-litre V6 developing 235kW/381Nm. A 2.0-litre turbo-diesel generating 125kW/400Nm will be optional on the LT and Calais only. Prices will start at $33,690. Check out the video below for the cool slow-mo crash test footage.

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.