• www.1800accident.com.au
  • www.1800accident.com.au
  • www.1800accident.com.au

2015 Hyundai i20 debuts Fluidic Sculpture 2.0 design

August 1, 2014

Hyundai has released early design sketches of the 2015 Hyundai i20, which will debut the company’s upcoming ‘Fluidic Sculpture 2.0’ design language that will eventually be applied to all models.

2015 Hyundai i20 sketch

The sketches show a rather striking design for the next compact segment vehicle, with a longer bonnet, more simplistic lines, and a sporty blacked-out C-pillar to give it a three-dimensional look. The headlights are also elongated and stretch right up to the front wheel arches.

It was designed at Hyundai’s Design Centre Europe in Russelsheim, Germany. The team is expected to come up with the fresh layout for various other models in the Hyundai showroom in the near future.

2015 Hyundai i20 sketch-rear

In terms of specifics for the next i20, the company has refrained from revealing any major details. According to reports though, the new model will see improvements in efficiency and technology, with highlights such as a rear-view camera making its way into the range for the first time.

So far this year the Hyundai i20 has been the best-selling vehicle in the Light Under $25,000 segment, according to VFACTS figures. The local arm has sold 7736 examples (as of June), even exceeding sales of the popular Mazda2 (6616) by quite a margin.

Hyundai is likely to unveil the new model in full very soon.

UPDATE: Hyundai has been spotted test driving the new model, revealing the body in full. More images can be found at IndianAutosBlog.

2015 Hyundai i20-spotted

Brett is the editor and founder of PerformanceDrive. He's obsessed with driving, having played with Matchbox cars until he was tall enough to drive a real one. After initially working as a mechanic, Brett earned a degree in journalism and entered media as an editorial assistant at Top Gear Australia magazine. He then worked at CarAdvice.com.au. His dream is to live next door to the Nurburgring in Germany.